Spacer
News
News > Deep-Sea Vents Discovery

Deep-Sea Vents Discovery

  15/02/2011
Scientists aboard the Royal Research Ship James Cook have discovered a new set of deep-sea volcanic vents in the chilly waters of the Southern Ocean. The discovery is the fourth made by the research team in three years, which suggests that deep-sea vents may be more common in our oceans than previously thought.


 The newly discovered vents

Using an underwater camera system, the researchers saw slender mineral spires three metres tall, with shimmering hot water gushing from their peaks, and gossamer-like white mats of bacteria coating their sides. The vents are at a depth of 520 metres in a newly-discovered seafloor crater close to the South Sandwich Islands, a remote group of islands around 500 kilometres south-east of South Georgia.

"When we caught the first glimpse of the vents, the excitement was almost overwhelming," says Leigh Marsh, a University of Southampton PhD student who was on scientific watch at the time of the discovery.

 

Deep-sea vents are hot springs on the seafloor, where mineral-rich water nourishes lush colonies of microbes and deep-sea animals. In the three decades since scientists first encountered vents in the Pacific, around 250 have been discovered worldwide. Most have been found on a chain of undersea volcanoes called the mid-ocean ridge, however, and very few are known in the Antarctic.

 

"We're finding deep-sea vents more rapidly than ever before," says expedition leader Professor Paul Tyler of the University of Southampton’s School of Ocean and Earth Science, which is based at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton. “And we're finding some in places other than at mid-ocean ridges, where most have been seen before."

 

By studying the new vents, the team hope to understand more about the distribution and evolution of life in the deep ocean, the role that deep-sea vents play in controlling the chemistry of the oceans, and the diversity of microbes that thrive in different conditions beneath the waves.

 

The researchers were exploring ‘Adventure Caldera’, a crater-like hole in the seafloor three kilometres across and 750 metres deep at its deepest point. Despite its size, Adventure Caldera was only discovered last year by geophysicists from the British Antarctic Survey.

 

The new vents are the fourth set to be discovered around Antarctica in three expeditions since 2009. Their discovery is part of a project funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), which involves researchers from the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton, the British Antarctic Survey in Cambridge, the Universities of Southampton, Newcastle, Oxford, Bristol and Leeds, and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the US.

 

The current expedition is scheduled to end in Punta Arenas, Chile, on 22 February, and the team are posting regular updates and answering questions from school pupils.

 





comments powered by Disqus
Read more about:
 Current  waves  Environment 

Website: http://www.thesearethevoyages.net
Supplier: National Oceanography Centre Southampton

More news from this supplier:
Call for Applications from SMEs for Ocean Research Facilities
Marine Monitoring to Help Protect Lives at Sea
Prize for Rock Property Discovery
Unified and Accessible Global Marine Data to Become Available
Global Climate on Verge of Multi-decadal Change
Global Ocean Goes Online for Ocean Business
NOC Open for Business at Ocean Business
Ocean Current Monitoring Reveals Secrets of Changing UK Winters
Turbulence beneath Arctic Ice Investigated
Ocean Surface Slope Lowers Sea Level in Europe


XIXth International Hydrographic Conference Date Proposed
Boskalis Awarded Contract for Veja Mate Offshore Wind Farm
Teledyne RD Instruments 2015 Academic Product Grant Awardees
Fugro and Cross Group Awarded Multi-well GoM Contract
USACE Hydrographic Survey Boat Named
Coda Octopus MOTION Control Software Release
Large Pacific Ocean Survey Nears Completion
Relocation and Contract Wins for DOF Subsea Angola
River Ganges Navigation Capacity Improvement Study
AtlantOS: Transatlantic Integration of Ocean Observing Systems
Spacer
Spacer
Spacer
Spacer
Upcoming Events
Spacer
How to Use QPS' Qimera to Validate Processed Point Files

QPS Qimera processing software has been released earlier this year. To demonstrate the capabilities, this video shows how to load processed point files into a Qimera Project. It explains what processed point files are; how to specify the coordinate system of the project and the source files; how to create a Dynamic Surface from processed point files and how to change the dynamic surface and adjust the colour map to aid data editing and validation.

 

 

geo-matchingcomQPS Qimera on Geo-Matching.com

Spacer
Last 3 items:
Spacer
Last Comments
Spacer
Spacer
Spacer
Spacer
Spacer