How the Ocean Cleanup Tackles the Flow of Plastic Garbage at its Source

Video Included
The Ocean Cleanup, the Dutch non-profit organization developing advanced technologies to rid the world’s oceans of plastic, unveiled its invention to prevent the unrelenting flow of plastic pollution into the world’s oceans. The Interceptor™, under development by the Ocean Cleanup since 2015, complements the organization’s founding mission by attacking the flow of plastic garbage at its source, the world’s vast network of rivers. The Ocean Cleanup aims to tackle the 1,000 most polluting rivers, responsible for about 80% of ocean plastic pollution, before the end of 2025. “To truly rid the oceans of plastic, we need to both clean up the... (read more)
2019-10-29 10:08:10

USV Completes First Autonomous Circumnavigation of Antarctica

High-quality and Reliable Data Is Needed for Research Use
A 7m (23ft) long, wind-powered unmanned surface vehicle (USV) has become the first unmanned system to circumnavigate Antarctica. Known as SD 1020 and equipped with a suite of science-grade sensors, the vehicle collected data in previously uncharted waters, enabling new key insights into ocean and climate processes. A 7m (23ft) long, wind-powered unmanned surface vehicle (USV) has become the first unmanned system to circumnavigate Antarctica. Known as SD 1020 and equipped with a suite of science-grade sensors, the vehicle collected data in previously uncharted waters, enabling new key insights into ocean and climate processes. USV SD 1020 left for the 196-day mission from Southport in Bluff, New Zealand, on 19 January 2019. It returned to the same port on 3 August after sailing over 22,000km (13,670 miles or 11,879 nautical miles) around Antarctica. During the mission, the vehicle survived freezing temperatures, 15m (50ft) waves, 130km/h (80mph) winds... (read more)
2019-10-03 03:08:58

Divers Find What is Thought to be the Earliest Boatbuilding Site in the World

An 8,000-year-old wooden platform has been discovered off the Isle of Wight coast near Yarmouth in the UK,  BBC News reports. The seabed where the structure was found—at a depth of roughly 36 feet—would have been dry land when the platform was built, and still connected to the European mainland. The platform sits adjacent to and may have been part of Bouldnor Cliff, a submerged Mesolithic settlement first identified in 1999, which—among a number of discoveries—has yielded what is thought to be the earliest boatbuilding site in the world. Divers from the Maritime Archaeology Trust, which oversees the site, first spotted... (read more)
2019-08-23 09:29:17

First Version of the Russian Wave Energy Web-atlas

Scientists from Lomonosov MSU (Faculty of Geography) have published the first version of the Russian wave energy web-atlas. The test version of the web-atlas posted at http://autolab.geogr.msu.ru/wavenergy in open access. It contains data on the wave energy spatial distribution in the Black, Caspian, Baltic, Barents and the Kara seas. The atlas also contains information on the basic parameters of wind waves. Energy Potential of the Wind and Waves Scientists started developing of the web-atlas in 2018. The basis of the atlas consists of unique data on the energy potential of the wind and waves obtained due to results of the original... (read more)
2019-07-19 01:24:23

An Integrated View of Greenland Ice Sheet Mass Changes

The Greenland ice sheet is a major contributor to sea level rise, adding on average 0.47 ± 0.23mm a year to the global mean sea level between 1991 and 2015, an international group of scientists has found. The cryosphere as a whole has contributed around 45% of observed global sea level rise since 1993. Understanding the present-day state of the Greenland ice sheet is therefore vital for understanding the processes controlling the modern-day rates of sea level change and for making projections of sea level rise in the future. In a recent publication on www.mdpi.com, they provide an overview of the current... (read more)
2019-07-08 09:01:19

Underwater Noise Monitoring in the North Sea

Jomopans Project to Monitor Continuous Sound
Sound is of vital importance for marine animals. Eleven institutes from the countries bordering the North Sea have joined forces in the Jomopans project to implement a novel monitoring strategy for underwater sound. Due to the growth of human activities in the sea, sound pollution is a growing concern for marine environmental managers. High levels of anthropogenic noise disturb animals, but the integrated impact of noise on the marine ecosystem is largely unknown. In the Joint Monitoring Programme of Ambient Noise in the North Sea (Jomopans) project, measurements at sea are combined with noise maps from numerical modeling to assess the quantitative levels of sound at sea. Sound is of vital importance for marine animals. Eleven institutes from the countries bordering the North Sea have joined forces in the Jomopans project to implement a novel monitoring strategy for underwater sound. Due to the growth of human activities in the sea, sound pollution is a growing concern for marine environmental managers. High levels of anthropogenic noise disturb animals, but the integrated impact of noise on the marine ecosystem is largely unknown. In the Joint Monitoring Programme of Ambient Noise in the North Sea (Jomopans) project, measurements at sea are combined with noise maps from numerical modeling to assess... (read more)
2019-06-18 04:01:43

USGS and Scientists Test Drone-based Stream Gauging at 2019 Aquatic Airshow

The US Geological Survey (USGS) and independent scientists gathered recently in Auburn, Maine, to evaluate the use of sensor-mounted unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), or drones, to gauge stream stage, velocity, bathymetry, and discharge. The technology is being evaluated and modelled to determine whether it will support the fast, accurate and safe measurement of rivers, especially when they are flooded or contain floating trees, ice or other debris. Two Dozen Experts Close to two dozen hydrologic, geospatial and scientific experts gathered in what has been dubbed the '2019 Aquatic Airshow' to assess this technology. They were led by John Fulton of... (read more)
2019-06-10 11:03:06

Unique 3D Habitat Map of the Great Barrier Reef

International aquatic remote sensing company EOMAP recently showcased its unique contribution to the world's first 3D habitat map of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) at the International Forum on Satellite-Derived Bathymetry (SDB Day 2019) in Australia. The mapping project, titled ‘3D live habitats for the full extent of the Great Barrier Reef’, will for the first time provide maps of the predicted coral types and underwater landscape for the more than 3,000 reefs within the 350,000 square kilometres of the GBR. EOMAP’s cutting-edge technology provides essential data for this revolutionary project, in which the University of Queensland (UQ), Great Barrier Reef Marine Park... (read more)
2019-05-20 10:58:04

Royal HaskoningDHV Develops Master Plan for the Mekong Delta

Dutch-based Royal HaskoningDHV has been selected to deliver the first integrated Master Plan for the Mekong Delta in Vietnam, funded by the World Bank. The plan will set out development orientations and spatial planning across different disciplines in the Mekong Delta to 2030, with a further view towards 2050. Digitally based decision-making is a critical component of this future-focused plan. Trade Mission An official signing ceremony took place on 9 April, witnessed by Dutch Minister of Infrastructure and Water Management, Cora van Nieuwenhuizen, both visiting the country as part of a trade mission, and the Deputy Prime Minister of Vietnam,... (read more)
2019-04-11 10:20:34

Sonardyne’s PIES to Monitor Disruptive US Gulf Current

Oceanographic equipment developed by underwater technology company Sonardyne International will be used as part of a major US$2 million scientific study of disruptive ocean currents in the US Gulf of Mexico. The multi-year deployment, led by the University of Rhode Island (URI)’s Graduate School of Oceanography, will monitor the Loop Current System (LCS) using Sonardyne’s Pressure Inverted Echo Sounders (PIES). The LCS is the dominant ocean circulation feature in the Gulf of Mexico. It influences all ocean processes in the Gulf and has implications for a wide range of human and natural activities, from oil exploration to coastal eco-systems, but,... (read more)
2019-04-02 10:19:12
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