Oceanology International 2016 Provides Update on Ocean Technology

Promising Event for Oceanographic and Hydrographic Community
Hydro International traditionally prepares a preview of Oceanology International to help you prepare for the highlights of what businesses on the show floor will be presenting. The Hydro International preview offers you a selection of the more than 350 companies from 32 countries that will be present at the trade show. The total surface is over 8,000 square metres so consider wearing your walking boots!  Joost Boers, editorial manager, Hydro International There will also be is a conference during Oceanology focusing on streams like Trade & Innovation; Marine Technology and Services Sector Role in the Blue Economy; Marine Renewables; Positioning & Metrology; Green Shipping;... (read more)
2016-03-01 11:47:03

Ocean Business 2013 Preview

More Variety at an Expanded Trade Show
Southampton, in the south of the UK’s Hampshire region, will be buzzing from 9 to 11 April 2013 as hydrographic, oceanographic and offshore professionals gather for an even bigger edition of Ocean Business. The organisers expect the 300 exhibitors to welcome 4,000 visitors and delegates to the National Oceanographic Centre grounds and inform them about the latest technologies. Hydro International invited exhibitors to give their preview, which we have published on these pages to give you a taste of what’s on offer during the event. 3D Laser Mapping 3D Laser Mapping is a ­world-leading provider of laser scanning technology. Established... (read more)
2013-04-02 02:56:31

Improving Safety at Sea

Hydro international Interviews Pedro Pedreira
Last month we brought you a feature article on the recent progress in the European satellite navigation system, Galileo. We discussed the motivation, the funding problems and the procurement process. Here we discuss this further with engineer Pedro Pedreira, who has been executive director of the European Global Navigation Satellite System Supervisory Authority (GSA) since July 2005, which is charged to manage the development phase of the Galileo programme. Can you please introduce yourself and tell the readers of Hydro international a little about your career and how you came to be posted as the head of the European Global... (read more)
2009-03-27 12:00:00

Much More Than a Typical Hydrographic Office

Hydro International Interviews Capt Brian Connon, Director NGA Marine Safety Office
In October 2015, Capt Brian D. Connon assumed the role of director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency’s Maritime Safety Office. The organisation is an important, although not always visible, link in the global maritime safety chain. Its work contributes to generic marine safety and, due to the nature of the data collected and analysed, its role is especially relevant for security, humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. In this interview with Hydro International, Capt Brian Connon lays out the role of hydrographic data and technologies in the NGA. Can you briefly outline the work of the NGA? The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) is the United States’ primary... (read more)
2016-04-04 10:34:50

Shallow Survey 2003

Interview with Dr Phil Chapple, Scientist, Conference Convenor, Australia
After completing a Bachelor of Science with Honours in Physics in 1983, Dr Phil Chapple worked in a laboratory of the Australian Defence Science & Technology Organisation (DSTO) where lasers were being developed for Australia’s Laser Airborne Depth Sounder (LADS). He returned to university to study for a PhD in Physics (laser spectroscopy), returned again to DSTO to investigate laser-material interactions and later worked some years on statistical image processing techniques. He completed the degree of Master of Mathematical Sciences (Signal & Information Processing), meanwhile learning details of sonar signal processing. In 1999 he moved to the DSTO Maritime Operations... (read more)
2008-01-01 01:00:00

100 Years of Service

This year marks the 100th Anniversary of the Commissioned Corps of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA Corps). The law forming the service was signed on 22 May 1917 and overnight made the field officers of the then United States Coast and Geodetic Survey uniformed commissioned officers. Literally hundreds of hydrographers, topographers and geodesists have since served in this uniformed service. As such, a look back at the origins and history of this organisation is in order. Many elements of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and its commissioned officer service are direct descendants of the US Coast... (read more)
2017-03-13 02:16:05

Following a Legacy

Hydro international Interviews Albert II, Prince of Monaco
At the invitation of Prince Albert I, the Principality of Monaco has been the headquarters of the International Hydrographic Organization since 1921. Looking at the annual reports of the International Hydrographic Bureau, the Government of the Principality has always been generous with the Organisation, providing it with beautiful premises and constant diplomatic support. Prince Albert II, Sovereign Prince of Monaco since April 2005, continues the tradition of his predecessors. Since 2001, Prince Albert is also president of the International Commission for the Scientific Exploration of the Mediterranean. He kindly accepted to be interviewed by Hydro international. You were named after... (read more)
2009-05-12 12:00:00

The Arctic Field Party

It seems ironic that in the early stages of the Cold War, the United States Government sent surveyors and hydrographic engineers to the coldest reaches of the North American continent. For these men, it was truly a Cold War. From 1945 through 1953, field parties of the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey were sent to survey sea routes through the Bering, Chukchi and Beaufort Seas as well as to conduct geodetic surveys to help position Distant Early Warning system radars and help delineate the vast resources of the Alaskan Arctic. These men toiled in obscurity beneath the midnight sun... (read more)
2017-07-04 11:00:42

Ice Navigation and the ­Electronic Age

Still No Perfect Electronic Solution to the Challenges of Ice Navigation
Ice navigation is more of an art than a science, and like most arts, does not fit neatly into any scheme for enhancement by electronic means. It is an art learned in theory at navigation school, and perfected by many years of practical experience in forcing ships though ice. The successful ice-navigator is living proof that the human brain processes data faster, and with more accurate results for correct decision-making, than any computer currently in service. Thus, it becomes clear that electronic assistance to the process will consist mainly of the provision of tools, which will not only make the... (read more)
2013-01-18 02:19:55

The Grounding and Sinking of MV 'Minna'

The high cost of exploration in subarctic, often uncharted, waters was demonstrated in an unorthodox but convincing way by the 1974 grounding and sinking of the MV <i>Minna<i> off Resolution Island [Canada] while conducting a combined hydrographic-geophysical survey in the northern Labrador Sea. By David H. Gray, Definitive Hydrographic & Geodetic Consulting, Canada. Minna was an 83.6m long (274ft), ice-strengthened freighter built in 1960 at Arendel, Norway, as MV Varla Dan and subsequently sold to the Karlsen Shipping Company of Halifax who changed her name. Bedford Institute of Oceanography (BIO) in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada, chartered her in 1972, 1973, and 1974 for... (read more)
2016-11-24 02:11:24
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