Much More Than a Typical Hydrographic Office

Hydro International Interviews Capt Brian Connon, Director NGA Marine Safety Office
In October 2015, Capt Brian D. Connon assumed the role of director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency’s Maritime Safety Office. The organisation is an important, although not always visible, link in the global maritime safety chain. Its work contributes to generic marine safety and, due to the nature of the data collected and analysed, its role is especially relevant for security, humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. In this interview with Hydro International, Capt Brian Connon lays out the role of hydrographic data and technologies in the NGA. Can you briefly outline the work of the NGA? The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) is the United States’ primary... (read more)
2016-04-04 10:34:50

2D/3D Web-mapping

Web Visualisation Coastal Orthophotos
This paper describes the development of a web spatial image server used for sharing huge sets of georeferenced coastal orthophotos on the web via an easy visualisation interface. Traditional cartography was considered a highly sophisticated methodology for the production of high-quality maps, using the sales-business model of the non-internet economy and dedicated to specialists. The recent arrival on the scene of three internet leaders whose general mission is to map everything, and the release of their popular online earth browsers has had a huge impact in the geomatics arena. All are by now familiar with the success enjoyed by Google... (read more)
2007-03-02 12:00:00

Human Resources in Hydrography

Nowadays challenges are enforced by advanced technology
Certainly, all of us belonging to the hydrographic community have heard, read or even written, dozens and maybe hundreds of times about the importance of human resources when referring to the performance of reliable hydrographic surveys. That is a fact that upon which we have remarked and seen with some nostalgia, mainly because of the human tendency to consider that ‘Everything was better in the past…’ Nevertheless, whether we like it or not, things have somehow changed. The advancements of technology are marking tracks in the way our professionals are facing the challenge of extracting from nature the precise data... (read more)
2008-01-01 01:00:00

Bering Sea ASV Force Multiplier

Arctic Hydrographic Survey Achieves Production Gains by Utilising ASV Technology
TerraSond, a hydrographic services company based in Palmer, Alaska (USA), used a C-Worker 5 (CW5) unmanned autonomous surface vessel (ASV) in conjunction with a 105’ (32m) research vessel from June through August 2016 on a major hydrographic survey in the Bering Sea region of Alaska. The ASV served as a force-multiplier, collecting multibeam and towed sidescan data alongside the larger vessel, which surveyed adjacent lines simultaneously. The 18’ (5.5m) ASV collected 2,275 nautical line miles (4,213km) – 44% of the project total – and achieved an industry first in terms of data production rates utilising ASV technology in the Arctic.... (read more)
2016-11-22 01:57:29

Sea Level Rise Modelling

In a Caribbean Small Island Developing State
In 2009, a research project was implemented to study the potential socio-economic impacts of climate change upon coastal communities in Canada and the Caribbean. Grande Riviere in Trinidad and Tobago, one of the study sites, is an important nesting site for leatherback turtles. Turtle watching, part of eco-tourism conducted in that part of the country, is an important source of income for the community. Any significant rise in mean sea level may negatively impact the turtles’ nesting sites and consequently negatively impact Grande Riviere’s socio-economic wellbeing. Hydrographic and topographic surveying techniques and GIS were used to construct spatial models that... (read more)
2011-12-19 04:03:39

WiMUST – A Fleet of AUVs for Seismic Surveys

EU-funded WiMust Project Advances a Novel Appraoch to Existing Methods
The ongoing WiMUST (Widely scalable Mobile Underwater Sonar Technology) project aims to design and test a system of cooperating autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) that would simplify seismic surveying and offer significant advantages over modern streamer-towing operations. Seismic surveys are a crucial part of offshore exploration, producing detailed imagery of sub-bottom rock formations that enables the location and evaluation of oil and gas deposits. Other commercial, scientific and military uses include assessments of the seabed for offshore construction, installations of renewable energy infrastructure, academic studies of the geology, civil engineering projects in shallow coastal zones, etc. Traditionally, seismic acoustic surveys are... (read more)
2017-05-12 11:40:52

Improving Overall Resolution of Bathymetric Survey

Integrated Use of Multi-beam Echo Sounder and Towed Interferometric Sonar
Designing offshore engineering facilities requires large amounts of information. To acquire it, suites of engineering and geophysical surveys are run, which as a rule include such techniques of seabed and sub-bottom investigation as seismic profiling, acoustic, magnetic and bathymetric surveys. Obtaining accurate and detailed seabed bathymetry is extremely important because the quality of other surveys depends on the quality of the bathymetry. One of the most accurate and cost-effective ways to acquire high-resolution bathymetric data is the use of shipborne bathymetric systems such as multi-beam echo sounders (MBES) or interferometers. The drawback of this method is that the resolution of... (read more)
2012-04-19 03:50:13

Exploring Coral Reef Sustainability

The Island of Bonaire in the Southwest Caribbean, a Marine Protected Area since 1979, has one of the most pristine coral reefs in the region. The last synoptic survey of the leeward coast was by the Dutch scientist Dr Fleur van Duyl in the 1980s and parts of the deeper reef have never been mapped. In January 2008, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) funded a unique expedition to Bonaire, deploying three compact Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) carrying various oceanographic instrumentation packages and a swath bathymetry sonar.<p> The crystal-clear watersand schools of reef fish made an enchanting setting... (read more)
2008-08-27 12:00:00

Remarkable Achievements

International Oceanographic Commission Celebrates 50th Anniversary
The International Oceanographic Commission (IOC) turns 50 this year. Since the UNESCO Commission was established in 1960 the IOC has made some remarkable achievements with relatively small resources. IOC is successful in finding effective ways of co-operation with sister organisations, says Wendy Watson-Wright, executive secretary since last January. Ms. Watson-Wright, you took over as IOC Executive Secretary on 4 January 2010. Can you tell us a little bit about your background and why you decided to apply for this prestigious post?I spent 21 years in the federal public service of Canada, 19 of which were spent in Fisheries and Oceans... (read more)
2010-05-31 10:26:44

Underwater Noise Monitoring in the North Sea

Jomopans Project to Monitor Continuous Sound
Sound is of vital importance for marine animals. Eleven institutes from the countries bordering the North Sea have joined forces in the Jomopans project to implement a novel monitoring strategy for underwater sound. Due to the growth of human activities in the sea, sound pollution is a growing concern for marine environmental managers. High levels of anthropogenic noise disturb animals, but the integrated impact of noise on the marine ecosystem is largely unknown. In the Joint Monitoring Programme of Ambient Noise in the North Sea (Jomopans) project, measurements at sea are combined with noise maps from numerical modeling to assess the quantitative levels of sound at sea. Sound is of vital importance for marine animals. Eleven institutes from the countries bordering the North Sea have joined forces in the Jomopans project to implement a novel monitoring strategy for underwater sound. Due to the growth of human activities in the sea, sound pollution is a growing concern for marine environmental managers. High levels of anthropogenic noise disturb animals, but the integrated impact of noise on the marine ecosystem is largely unknown. In the Joint Monitoring Programme of Ambient Noise in the North Sea (Jomopans) project, measurements at sea are combined with noise maps from numerical modeling to assess... (read more)
2019-06-18 04:01:43
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