Securing Offshore Oil and Gas Infrastructure with USVs

Employing commercial-off-the-shelf USVs that can be rapidly reconfigured with a diverse range of sensors can enhance the ability to deliver energy to America and the world. This is a win-win for the energy industry, says George Caldorisi when he describes the securing of oil and gas infrastructure with Unmanned Surface Vehicles. While the exigencies of climate change have led to major strides in the development and deployment of renewable energy sources such as solar, wind and others, the world’s energy needs will continue to be met primarily by oil and natural gas for the foreseeable future. As readers of Hydro International are well aware, the strategic implications of the United States’ transition from energy dependence to energy independence to becoming a net oil and gas exporter are being felt worldwide. While some saw this sea change coming, most did not, and the community of nations is still coming to grips with... (read more)
2020-04-06 09:50:21

Research Expedition to Map Scottish Seabed

Slow Recovery of Coral Reef Shows Impact of Bottom Trawling
Newly developed 3D imaging technology has allowed scientists to map Darwin Mounds, a unique area of cold-water coral reefs off the coast of Scotland, to see whether it has recovered since being declared a Marine Protected Area sixteen years ago. The images show that in areas of the Darwin Mounds that had been heavily trawled, coral growth is still very sparse, and there has been no real recolonization. However, healthy coral growth was found in parts that had only been minimally damaged by bottom trawling, indicating that marine conservation measures are most effective when they are put in place before damage occurs.... (read more)
2020-05-18 01:46:12

Subsea Autonomy is Moving Beyond Waypoints

Underwater an AUV Must Rely Upon its Own Sensor Network
The AUV has been the tool of choice for shallow-water MCM and EOD operations for a number of years. The coverage by popular news channels of unfortunate events, such as the MH370 tragedy, has also shown that the AUV has undisputedly become the tool of choice to carry out salvage operations at extreme depths. The AUV has no physical link to the surface and the majority of missions are still pre-programmed by a human, which can be time consuming and error prone. Missions are normally a sequence of defined waypoints where the AUV may be required to carry out certain... (read more)
2020-06-09 09:41:02

Invited Reply

Hydrography or Hydrogeomatics?
In common with all sciences, hydrography too is undergoing rapid change with regard to data acquisition and processing, instrumentation, application and many other aspects. Differing ideas may be found within the hydrographic community concerning these developments, which direction to take, change in the nature of the science, etc. and some opinions are to some extent controversial. Hydro international would like to draw attention to such diverse opinions when and in whatever context they arise by modifying her traditional interview in this issue by a column entitled ‘Invited Reply’. The pertinent question will here be answered by six prominent figures from... (read more)
2008-01-01 01:00:00

Completion of the JICA Group Training Course

10 training course participants received IBSC Category B certification
On 17 December 2015, the closing ceremony of the JICA group training course for hydrographic surveying was held at JICA Tokyo International Center in Tokyo, Japan. At the closing ceremony, an IBSC Category B certification for Hydrographic Surveying was presented to 10 training course participants by Vice Admiral Shigeru Kasuga, chief hydrographer of Japan. The participants came from eight countries, namely the Ivory Coast, Egypt, Guyana, Indonesia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Tonga and Vietnam, and completed the course in six months. By Norio BABA, Akio YAMAMOTO, JHOD, Japan and Tomomi HIRATA, JICA Tokyo, Japan Considering this training course has now been conducted 45 times... (read more)
2016-02-11 04:01:07

Introducing GIS to Support Maritime Accessibility

Hydrographic Surveying in the Port of Rotterdam
The Port of Rotterdam is Europe’s largest port and is one of the world’s key logistic hubs. Hydrographic data is critical to the Harbour master’s department for the operation of the Port of Rotterdam, to support the nautical accessibility of the deep-sea vessels by electronic nautical chart. The introduction of PortMaps enables the Port of Rotterdam to produce a wide variety of information products, including ENCs, from the Port’s survey data, in less than 48 hours. With over 500 line connections to and from more than 1,000 ports around the globe, the Port of Rotterdam in The Netherlands is the cornerstone of international freight transport. It is the perfect base for import and export and a gateway to the European market and its more than 500 million consumers. However, this favourable location has one downside, namely siltation. Therefore, hydrographic surveys are conducted on a daily basis in the Port of Rotterdam using a survey programme based on siltation rates, dredging operations, port operations and client requests. Facts & figures about the Port of Rotterdam: Port area: 12,500ha (land... (read more)
2015-11-18 03:49:43

Lidar Bathymetry on the Alaskan North Slope

Inventory and Characterisation of More than 4,500 Shallow-water Bodies
In June 2014, the Bureau of Economic Geology, a research unit at the University of Texas at Austin, was contracted to conduct an airborne bathymetric Lidar survey on the Alaskan North Slope. The purpose of the project was to further determine, understand, and map the local landscape and thaw-lake attributes of an area west of the Dalton Highway and Sagavanirktok (Sag) River, approximately 30km southwest of Deadhorse, Alaska. Researchers from the Bureau had visited the area in 2012 and found bathymetric Light Detection and Ranging (Lidar) to be an effective tool for measuring the area’s lakes. The group returned in... (read more)
2016-04-04 10:08:41

AEM Bathymetry

Using geophysical exploration techniques to map shallow seawater depths
Airborne Electro Magnetic Bathymetric (AEMB) mapping is useful in turbid and surf-zone waters where lidar systems are not fully effective. Coastal areas of hydrographic importance containing turbidity, shoals and channels have been surveyed. This article describes AEM systems, gives highlights from surveys in Sydney Harbour and mentions refinements that would improve bathymetric accuracy. For several decades geophysicists have been using a transmitter loop fixed to an aircraft or towed by a helicopter to emit a magnetic field into the ground to search for mineral deposits. Currents thus induced in the ground generate a return magnetic field that can be detected... (read more)
2008-01-01 01:00:00

Hydrographic Use of Satellite Imagery in South Pacific

The French Hydrographic Office (SHOM) uses remotely sensed visible imagery for the cartography of atolls and reefs. It is considered as an efficient and relatively inexpensive method to collect information where data is sparse. Remotely sensed visible imagery is used in Pacific French Overseas territories for the cartography of atolls, reefs et cetera. All shallow-water areas may be involved, in particular when the cost of usual hydrography would be out of proportion with maritime traffic. Remotely sensed imagery is mixed with all field information available (bathymetry, buoys, seamarks) and a ‘spatiocarte’ (spatio-chart) is produced, which provides information on: Land: coastline,... (read more)
2008-01-01 01:00:00

Successful Delivery of Coastal Survey Data to the Royal Australian Navy

IHO Order 1b Bathymetric Lidar Data
Amongst the largest contracted coastal hydrographic Lidar survey projects awarded in recent years is the Australian Hydrographic Service (AHS) survey of the Torres Strait in Northern Queensland. The intent of this very large survey was to update nautical charting in the region, facilitate safer navigation and enhance the capacity of maritime enforcement vessels to protect and secure Australian waters from incursions by illegal foreign fishing vessels. As it was to be used for international chart products, the survey data had to be of an accordingly high standard. Approximately 850km north from Cairns, the Torres Strait forms the confluence between the... (read more)
2010-05-31 10:44:08
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