Low-budget Hydrography

Opinions from differing backgrounds
Low-budget Hydrography is the theme of this issue. Realising that different players in hydrography will have differing opinions on various aspects of low-budget hydrography and interested in exploring these divergent views on your behalf, HI asked representatives from various camps for their opinions on some leading questions. The representatives interviewed are: Jeffrey F. Marlow, Survey Technician, US Army Corps of Engineers CDR Guy Noll, Commanding Officer, NOAA Ship RAINIER LTCDR Richard Cullen, Staff Officer Quality Control AHS Questions: 1. Can you briefly explain your position in the hydrographic world: your experience and present position? Cullen: I have been employed by... (read more)
2008-01-01 01:00:00

Excited by Automation Driven by Autonomous Vehicles

Hydro International Interviews Capt. Shep Smith
NOAA is one of the bigger organisations in the world that has surveying and charting in its portfolio. It’s an immense task as the USA has about 95,000 miles of coastline, important ports and a wide range of users – from recreational boaters to the biggest container vessels and tankers. The country also has to deal with environmental disasters like hurricanes and oil spills. NOAA is undergoing changes as the chart portfolio is ‘going digital’ and new initiatives such as using Maritime Autonomous Systems (MAS) for surveys. Hydro International interviews Capt Shep Smith, who generously gave an insight behind the scenes. NOAA is one of the bigger organisations in the world that has surveying and charting in its portfolio. It’s an immense task as the USA has about 95,000 miles of coastline, important ports and a wide range of users – from recreational boaters to the biggest container vessels and tankers. The country also has to deal with environmental disasters like hurricanes and oil spills. NOAA is undergoing changes as the chart portfolio is ‘going digital’ and new initiatives such as using Maritime Autonomous Systems (MAS) for surveys. Hydro International has interviewed Capt Shep Smith, who generously gave an insight behind... (read more)
2015-12-01 09:18:32

The Future of ECDIS

After a gap of five years, the 2nd ECDIS Conference took place in Singapore in October 2003. At first glance everything was as before: the venue of the conference, its organisers, the lecturers and companies involved, and Ð strangely enough Ð even many of the titles of the presentations. But the most important item had changed and this was the mood in which the topic was presented. Five years ago almost everybody agreed that we were about to see a great breakthrough in the ambitious IMO/IHO ECDIS venture. This time, a gloomy mood of resignation and frustration seems to have... (read more)
2008-01-01 01:00:00

Sea Levels and the Coast

The oceans are a central part of the global climate system. As Roger Revelle, one of the early directors of the Scripps Institute of Oceanography, said, “The oceans exert a profound influence on mankind and indeed upon all forms of life on Earth. The oceans are inexhaustible sources of water and heat, and control the climate of many parts of the world.” He also recognised that “human beings are now carrying out a large-scale geophysical experiment of a kind that could have not have happened in the past nor be reproduced in the future”. Roger Revelle’s thoughts have even more... (read more)
2007-10-27 12:00:00

The Rocknes Casualty 2004

A Chartmaker’s Retrospect
The MV Rocknes (about 17,000 GRT (Gross Register Tons), draught approximately 10.5m, see Figure 1), en route from Eikefet, Norway to Emden, Germany, hit a shoal in Vatlestraumen, Norway on 19 January 2004. The vessel carried a pilot from the Norwegian Coastal Administration (NCA). Soon after the grounding the ship capsized with the loss of 18 crew. 12 crew were rescued. Norwegian Hydrographic Service (NHS) was blamed for not publishing its knowledge of a presumed new shoal in the Vatlestraumen. Three subsequent lawsuits were necessary to establish a credible explanation of the accident’s root causes. 10 years after the serious... (read more)
2014-07-17 01:17:21

Grounding of the Queen Elizabeth 2 (response)

The Rest of the Story
Last month we brought you the story of the famous Cunard cruise liner Queen Elizabeth 2 (QE2), which grounded on 7 August 1992 off the coast of Martha’s Vineyard and the state of Rhode Island. Captain Lusk stated that the US judicial system arrived at the wrong decision regarding who was at fault for the QE2 grounding and suggested that the US agency for this survey, the US Coast and Geodetic Survey, predecessor to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), should have investigated and determined the shoal depth. On this page we give NOAA the opportunity to respond to... (read more)
2009-06-26 12:00:00

Technology in Focus: Underwater Electromagnetic Propagation

Re-evaluating Wireless Capabilities
Underwater wireless communications links have almost exclusively been implemented using acoustic systems. Optical links have proved impractical for many applications. Although underwater radio links were experimentally evaluated in the pioneering days of radio, they did not meet the requirements of the time. Given modern operational requirements and digital communications technology, the time is now ripe for re-evaluating the role of electromagnetic signals in the underwater environment. Background Underwater electromagnetic communications have been investigated since the very early days of radio, and again received considerable attention during the 1970s. Then terrestrial radio typically delivered manual digital communications (Morse code) or full... (read more)
2008-01-01 01:00:00

Enhancing Port and Harbour Security with Unmanned Surface Vehicles

As readers of Hydro International know, the world’s ports and harbours are crucial to global trade. From Singapore to Antwerp, to Shanghai, to Rotterdam, to Los Angeles to other mega-ports and hundreds of other smaller ports, these crucial nodes are critical to world trade. A disaster like a fire, explosion, or a major oil spill could close one of these ports for an indefinite time. The secondary effects of such a catastrophe could include releasing a huge amount of pollution into rivers and oceans. As readers of Hydro International know, the world’s ports and harbours are crucial to global trade. From Singapore to Antwerp, and from Shanghai to Rotterdam, Los Angeles, other mega-ports and hundreds of other smaller ports, these crucial nodes are critical to world trade. A disaster like a fire, explosion or major oil spill could close one of these ports for an indefinite time. The secondary effects of such a catastrophe could include releasing a huge amount of pollution into rivers and oceans. The magnitude of providing comprehensive security for an average size port – let alone some of the world’s... (read more)
2020-04-17 09:56:56

The Advancing Technology of AUVs

A View of the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Market
Since the last autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) review in 2016, the market has continued to grow. The biggest market for AUV systems remains the military. The world’s most advanced Navies own and operate low-logistic AUV systems for mine countermeasures (MCM) in very shallow waters. These systems can operate in confined areas where MCM vessels cannot. The same systems can also be used in search and recovery operations, hydrography and salvage. This market used to be dominated by a handful of AUV providers. However, the number of manufacturers is increasing. Defence primes are also investing in these technologies through internal development... (read more)
2018-12-04 09:23:07

US Navy Hydrography Is Back!

The US Navy has a strong tradition in hydrography and has restated its commitment to this field by naming the Commander of the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command as the ‘Hydrographer of the Navy’. This was the culmination of significant focus and effort during the past decade by the US Navy’s meteorology and oceanography (METOC) community to improve not just hydrography, but all forms of environmental data collection. During the Cold War, METOC resources were concentrated on deep-water operations; hydrographic expertise, especially among Naval officers, was not maintained at a sufficient level to support the current naval doctrine of littoral... (read more)
2008-01-01 01:00:00
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