Motion Sensor Performance

Direct Comparison Using 2005 Common Dataset
Integral components of a swathe bathymetry system are the motion and heading sensors. The current trend is to offer a system that combines both components in one package, either as an aided inertial sensor or as two sensors linked by component software. The quality of these inertial sensors has a direct effect on the quality of the final survey. This paper compares five leading available sensors, concluding that they produce markedly differing results. Most surveyors when purchasing or specifying a particular inertial system for a project will base their decision on information generated by the manu-facturers, which often shows all... (read more)
2008-01-01 01:00:00

Businesswoman in the Middle East

Interview with Susan Murray, General Manager of the Seatronics’ Middle East office
Ms Murray joined Oceonics (the forerunner of Seatronics) in 1981. It was here that she got her first taste of business in the hydrographic Industry, specifically in the sales environment. After spending a couple of years gaining valuable experience with another equipment rental company in Aberdeen, she returned to Oceonics as Sales Manager. Between 1987 and 1996 she was the General Manager of her own equipment rental company in Aberdeen, selling this in 1996. In 2000 she decided it was time to move on and, believing herself too young to retire, agreed to take on the role of Middle East... (read more)
2008-01-01 01:00:00

Resuming New-Zealand Charting After World War II

By an Old Hydrographer
After World War II, ship owners pressured the New Zealand Government to resume charting of coastal waters by the Royal Navy. Ships were now larger and most charts were a hundred years old. The Government approached Britain, which declined but kindly offered assistance to set up a new hydrographic service. The New Zealand Government and the Navy Board agreed that surveys must be resumed and that the Navy should undertake them. Here there were competent officers to train as hydrographic surveyors, a disciplined organisation and a large enough crew to be able to handle the ship, six boats and two... (read more)
2008-01-01 01:00:00

Citizen Mapping and Charting (Part 1)

The Concept of Crowdsourcing and Its Applications
Since the dawn of time people have been making maps. Such mapping was initially done by anyone and everyone. Eventually mapping became the domain of skilled map makers. Then technology changed the game. GPS, digital cameras and broadband internet arrived, and now many successful environmental mapping projects are largely carried out by volunteers, a variation of the phenomenon now known as crowdsourcing. The pace of volunteered geographical information (also known as Citizen Mapping) goes on with or without the involvement of mapping agencies. But what about Citizen Charting? And how may hydrographic organisations be enticed to get involved and help... (read more)
2009-10-05 10:21:08

Government and Private Surveying Working Together

Hydro International Interviews Captain Nuhu Jidere Bala, Hydrographer of the Nigerian Navy
Nigeria is a country that plays an important role for the African continent, even though this is not at all times apparent. It has quite a lot of offshore activity and its ports handled 22,324,223 million metric tonnes of cargo in the first nine months of 2014. Improving the waterways is one of the goals the management has set itself. Add to this all the inland waterways that have an economic significance as well. This makes it interesting to talk to Captain Nuhu Jidere Bala, Hydrographer of Nigeria. Nigeria has almost one thousand kilometres of coastline and eight thousand kilometres... (read more)
2015-04-03 01:41:51

Bering Sea ASV Force Multiplier

Arctic Hydrographic Survey Achieves Production Gains by Utilising ASV Technology
TerraSond, a hydrographic services company based in Palmer, Alaska (USA), used a C-Worker 5 (CW5) unmanned autonomous surface vessel (ASV) in conjunction with a 105’ (32m) research vessel from June through August 2016 on a major hydrographic survey in the Bering Sea region of Alaska. The ASV served as a force-multiplier, collecting multibeam and towed sidescan data alongside the larger vessel, which surveyed adjacent lines simultaneously. The 18’ (5.5m) ASV collected 2,275 nautical line miles (4,213km) – 44% of the project total – and achieved an industry first in terms of data production rates utilising ASV technology in the Arctic.... (read more)
2016-11-22 01:57:29

Underwater Noise Monitoring in the North Sea

Jomopans Project to Monitor Continuous Sound
Sound is of vital importance for marine animals. Eleven institutes from the countries bordering the North Sea have joined forces in the Jomopans project to implement a novel monitoring strategy for underwater sound. Due to the growth of human activities in the sea, sound pollution is a growing concern for marine environmental managers. High levels of anthropogenic noise disturb animals, but the integrated impact of noise on the marine ecosystem is largely unknown. In the Joint Monitoring Programme of Ambient Noise in the North Sea (Jomopans) project, measurements at sea are combined with noise maps from numerical modeling to assess the quantitative levels of sound at sea. Sound is of vital importance for marine animals. Eleven institutes from the countries bordering the North Sea have joined forces in the Jomopans project to implement a novel monitoring strategy for underwater sound. Due to the growth of human activities in the sea, sound pollution is a growing concern for marine environmental managers. High levels of anthropogenic noise disturb animals, but the integrated impact of noise on the marine ecosystem is largely unknown. In the Joint Monitoring Programme of Ambient Noise in the North Sea (Jomopans) project, measurements at sea are combined with noise maps from numerical modeling to assess... (read more)
2019-06-18 04:01:43

‘Hydrography is Both a Science and a Technique’

7 Questions to the New Director General of the French Hydrographic Office
Chief weapons engineer Laurent Kerléguer was appointed director general of Shom, the French hydrographic office, in July 2019. In this interview, Hydro International asks him about the latest developments regarding the world of hydrography, climate change and artificial intelligence. “It’s becoming more urgent than ever to measure the ocean.” Chief weapons engineer Laurent Kerléguer was appointed director-general of Shom, the French hydrographic office, in July 2019. In this interview, Hydro International asks him about the latest developments regarding the world of hydrography, climate change and artificial intelligence. “It’s becoming more urgent than ever to measure the ocean.” Laurent Kerléguer was born in Brest, France, and has always lived by – or close to – the sea. Although he never had a ‘dream job’ as a child, he always had the feeling that his career would be linked to the sea. “For me as an engineer, hydrography is the perfect... (read more)
2019-10-29 11:34:23

Danish Hydrographic Office Turns to GIS For Automated Maritime Charting

A Radical Update Was Needed
Denmark has challenging seascapes to map and chart. It has a rich history of nautical charting that dates back to the seventeenth century, and many of its navigational products for Greenland were created in the 1960s. When GPS started to gain prominence, a radical update was needed. Apart from its 42-mile land border with Germany, the peninsular country of Denmark, with its scores of bays, straits, and fjords,  is surrounded almost entirely by the North and Baltic Seas. Denmark is also composed of more than 400 islands, including the Faroe Islands, located in the Atlantic Ocean between the United Kingdom... (read more)
2019-12-19 02:23:42

Surveying in the Ross Sea

The deepwater research vessel Tangaroa of the National Institute of Water & Atmospheric Research (NIWA) of New Zealand undertakes regular research expeditions to the Antarctic waters. In the last eight years, this 70m ice-strengthened vessel has successfully completed seven voyages to Antarctica: three of which were to the Ross Sea. This article describes her 48-day voyage in 2006. During this latest voyage, she once again collected data to extend our knowledge of the geophysical and biological make-up of the Ross Sea region Looking Back Tangaroa ’s first voyage to the Ross Sea was in February–March 2001, when it undertook a... (read more)
2007-05-09 12:00:00
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